Book Review: One Zentangle a Day

Book Review: One Zentangle a Day

In 2018, I began my doodle art journey with the book One Zentangle a Day by artist Beckah Krahula. I’d seen some videos here and there of people turning meditative patterns into gorgeous art, and I thought to myself it looked like fun—drawing for the pure joy of it. Maybe, I thought, I could learn to Zentangle too.

Enamored with the oddly satisfying doodle art videos I’d watched on YouTube after my adjuvant cancer treatments, I decided to record my daily lessons along the way. I tried new patterns and then put them together. The results were not great at first. As I learned and improved, I realized I was also creating a really thorough review of the book.

So, if after this written review of One Zentangle a Day, you’re still undecided, there are 42 more videos on my YouTube channel to help you.

Rating

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ (5/5)

Price

$10.49* (Amazon)

Pros

One Zentangle a Day is great for self-paced learning. The lessons are easy to complete and leave you with a sense of accomplishment each day. Explanations are detailed without being cumbersome, and the examples for using the patterns to create your own art are inspiring.

  • Structured daily lessons
  • Detailed text accompanying illustrations
  • More than 50 patterns
  • Step-by-step drawing instructions
  • Inspiring examples

Cons

I might be slightly biased, because it was my first foray into the world of Zentangle, but it seems to me this book has everything. Well, except the pens and paper you need to get started with Zentangle doodle art.

  • It’s square and doesn’t fit nicely on my bookshelf

Videos

If you don’t mind spoilers, watch the videos in my One Zentangle a Day YouTube playlist. You’ll get a brief glimpse at some of the pages, and a chance to see how I approached the 6-week course.

Bottom line: my review of One Zentangle a Day is glowing, and I highly recommend it. Not only is it a fun way to learn to Zentangle, but it’s a great reference for when you need to go back to a pattern or want some ideas for creating your own Zentangle-inspired art.

Here are some of the Zentangles I created while following the lessons in One Zentangle a Day.

I plan to continue doing Zentangle book reviews as I have time and money. If there’s a book you’d like to see me prioritize, you can leave a comment with your suggestion or gift a book from my wishlist.

* At time of post publishing.

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Book Review: Chelsea Chelsea Bang Bang


My Goodreads review of Chelsea Chelsea Bang Bang:

I’ve never seen her show, but after reading this book I think I understand why it’s on E!

Last weekend I got my Champaign Public Library card and promptly installed the app for checking out e-books. Eager to get started and see how things worked, I borrowed my first library e-book, Chelsea Chelsea Bang Bang.

Now, before you lay into me about how stupid that decision was, a few lame excuses:

  1. I did not recognize Chelsea Handler’s name
  2. Although I’d heard of the show Chelsea Lately somehow, somewhere before, I’d never seen it and was therefore unable to make the connection between Handler and E! until after she mentioned it in her book
  3. I’m a sucker for the words “irreverent humor” in a book review or description
  4. Many first-choice titles already had holds placed on them, and I wanted to devour a book, dammit

Just how much of Handler’s memoir is shtick and how much is factual is hard for me to determine. She seems at times to be genuinely atrocious (for example, joking—or maybe not—about euthanizing her father) until she dedicates an entire self-admiring chapter to the ridiculous lies she gets people to believe.

I suppose as readers we’re supposed to have some philosophical, internal debate about whether or not the whole book is a lie. Or about whether Chelsea Handler, the person, is a lie. But that doesn’t work for me. I know people like this in real life—people who get off on making others wonder if they’re genuine or if they’re not—and they’re tedious, off-putting jerkwads.

Ugh. This is why I don’t watch the programming on E! It turns me into Judgy McJudgerson.

Anyway, the book’s saving grace? It’s short, conversational, and well-edited. So if you’re like me and you get some sense of satisfaction from merely finishing a book, you can mark this sucker “read” in a couple of hours.

What I recommend instead of this book: Here Comes Trouble
What I’m reading now: In the Garden of Beasts

 

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