Zentangle-Inspired Mandala Art: Day 35

Zentangle-Inspired Mandala Art: Day 35

For Day 35, we’re practicing our third and final Zendala, which is Zentangle-inspired mandala art. The outline for this Zentangle was taken straight from Beckah Krahula’s book One Zentangle a Day: a 6-Week Course in Creative Drawing for Relaxation, Inspiration, and Fun, in case you were wondering why how I got it to look so symmetrical. The answer is — I traced it.

I highly recommend the book, by the way, if you are wanting to learn to Zentangle or if even you’re a Zentangle master just looking for inspiration to get back into a daily practice. You can just look at the pictures and tear through the exercises with abandon, or you read each carefully constructed lesson and really dig into the whats and whys and hows of the art.

I’ve been trying to post each of my videos here on the blog, so check out the Zentangles topic if you’d like to have a glance at what else I’ve created during this series. As always, I hope you’ll like and subscribe to my YouTube channel if you’re enjoying these videos. That lets YouTube know you like my channel and it helps other people find it through search and related content suggestions.

Zentangle Zendala Tile: Day 34

Zentangle Zendala Tile: Day 34

For Day 34, we’re practicing another Zentangle Zendala tile. A Zendala is a combination of Zentangle- and mandala-inspired art. What I like about them is the symmetry you can achieve by outlining a basic 360-degree pattern and then filling it in.

The Zendala I created for today’s lesson has a very geometric look to it, but you could just as easily use more organic, flowing patterns to give the art a softer more flower-like appearance.

In fact, I’d suggest making several copies of the basic outline in a sketchbook and then trying several different approaches to filling them in. The ‘Tangler in me really wants to fill every page of a notebook with the same basic outline and see how many different Zendalas I can create. Because some days, when my hands are too cramped or my pain is off the charts, I like to just flip through the library of art I’ve created. I promise it’s every bit as relaxing as actually drawing the art. Maybe even more so.

Shop Zentangle Sets

Anyway, I wanted to add color to today’s piece, so I went for a more simplified design this time around and used my Bianyo alcohol-based markers. I’m still learning how to select a good color palette, so I’m not crazy about the end result here, but I don’t hate it either.

Want to try your hand at creating your own Zentangles? I recommend Beckah Krahula’s book One Zentangle a Day: A 6 Week Course in Creative Drawing for Relaxation, Inspiration, and Fun. For pattern ideas, check out my post Zentangle Inspired Doodles.

Zentangle Zendala: Day 33

Zentangle Zendala: Day 33

For Day 33, we’re practicing a Zentangle Zendala, which is Zentangle inspired mandala art. At the request of one of my patrons, I’m slowing things down a bit and offering you what I hope to be a super relaxing and satisfying Zentangle video.

Because this video is real time, it’s a several minutes longer than other other videos I’ve created in this series. But hopefully you’ll find it’s well worth the watch time. If you like it, you can thank my friend Becky for her support and the video suggestion! And remember, if you’re pressed for time, you can always speed up any video by manually changing the playback rate through the YouTube interface. (Click the ‘Settings’ wheel on the bottom of the video and choose the playback speed you prefer.)

I’ve been enjoying creating this series for you guys. Putting these videos online is giving me an opportunity to pick up some new skills in addition to practicing art. For one, I’m learning some very basic video editing skills with Shotcut, but I’m learning the basics of growing a YouTube channel. Starting a channel from scratch helps me appreciate how truly effortless my favorite art YouTubers make this stuff look. There is so much that goes into creating video content, but so much more that goes into marketing, sharing, and optimizing those videos for search. Because if your videos don’t come up in a search, new people can’t find the stuff you worked so hard to create.

Shop Zentangle Sets

So, having said all that, I hope you’ll consider giving my videos a like on YouTube and subscribing to my channel. Every time you interact with my content, it lets the YouTube algorithms know that people are engaged. And that means they’ll suggest my videos to other people interested in Zentangle art. And *that* means I’ll be able to connect with other fans of the practice.

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