Easy Zentangle Patterns For Beginners

Easy Zentangle Patterns For Beginners

Sometimes you just want to chill out and draw, right? Each video in the 9 Easy Zentangle Patterns for Beginners series is designed to get you drawing fast. Follow along with the videos to learn more than 50 patterns, enjoying the ones that appeal to you the most.

These patterns are easy, but you can modify and embellish them to suit your style. After all, the whole point of tangling is to have fun, relax and express your creativity.

The Tutorials

Organic & Botanical Patterns
Heart Patterns
Freeform Patterns, Part 2
Lines & Orbs
Freeform Patterns, Part 2
Original Patterns, Part 1

Patterns are curated loosely into themes. If there’s a specific Zentangle you’d like to see me draw in an upcoming video, let me know with a comment. Sometimes seeing how someone else approaches drawing a pattern can make it easier.

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The Video that Started It All

Hi everyone! Today I have a video showing you how to draw 9 easy Zentangle patterns for beginners. As you can see, you don’t need any super fancy art supplies to get started. Just grab a piece of paper and something to write with. (I wouldn’t recommend using a ball-point pen, but it’ll still get the job done!)

In case you’re new to Zentangle art, here are the basics of the Zentangle method: It was created by Rick Roberts and Maria Thomas as a meditative form of art that’s accessible to everyone at all levels. It stresses drawing repetitive lines, simple marks, orbs, and other familiar shapes. Each mark is called a “tangle,” and you can combine tangles infinite ways to create “tiles,” or miniature drawings. 

The easy art Zentangle patterns I cover in this video are: Footlites, Wist, Roxy, Kuazeela, Squares Squared, Inapod, Wormholes, Embellish, and Narwhal, but there are literally hundreds more to try once you’ve got these down.

If you want to learn more about how the Zentangle method of drawing got its start, I recommend checking out Rick and Maria’s official website.

Zentangle Pattern Tripoli on White Zentangle Tile
Tripoli on White Zentangle Tile

Zentangle is a very relaxing, meditative form of drawing that got me through some pretty rough days while I underwent chemotherapy and radiation for a brain tumor. Even though I’m done with cancer treatment for now, I found drawing Zentangles to be so calming and therapeutic that I continued with daily practice and weekly videos on YouTube.

So sit back, relax, and let your inner artist follow along as you learn these beginner patterns. If you want to see more, subscribe to my YouTube channel. And don’t miss my suggestions for the best Zentangle pens.

How to Cope with Scanxiety: A Brain Cancer Survivor’s POV

How to Cope with Scanxiety: A Brain Cancer Survivor’s POV

Living with cancer is hard, but anxiety around routine scans compounds feelings of fear and worry. Scanxiety is the angst you feel when it’s time for another medical scan. I know it well. Too well. Here’s how I cope.

Meditation

If you’re new to meditation, I recommend a guided practice like this podcast episode from Tara Brach. Meditation brings you into the present. While your brain is focused on the here and now, it can’t be distracted by life’s “what ifs” and spend too much time imagining what could go wrong.

Exercise 

Take your dog for a walk, play a sport, or film a TikTok dance video. It matters less how you move and more that you move. Movement boosts endorphins and distracts you from your fixation on those MRI or PET scan results.

Medication

While being anxious over the results of a scan is a normal human emotion, It’s not one most of us enjoy. In fact, it can complicate an existing physical illness. And sometimes medication is the best way to deal with it. There’s no shame in getting help where you can find it.

Sleep Aids

Taking supplements like melatonin to help you sleep can prevent insomnia from making your scanxiety worse. Talk to your doctor to see whether starting a sleep regimen that includes melatonin might be helpful for you.

Medical Marijuana

While getting high can certainly be a fun way to take your mind off your worries, you can also microdose medical marijuana to keep calm. Take it before your exam and while you wait for your scan results. Make edibles with cannabutter or try vape for more immediate relief.

Prescriptions

Anti-anxiety medications like alprazolam can be very effective, and in the U.S. often come with the added benefit of being covered by insurance. Talk to your primary care physician or oncologist about your possibilities.

Hobbies

Reducing anxiety is about giving your brain something else to focus on. Something you enjoy. Here are a few ideas if you’re looking for something calming to do:

Zentangle

Zentangle is a form of meditative drawing that can reduce your symptoms. It is increasingly popular among cancer patients. Learn more about it here.

Baking

Many people report that baking for themselves or others is a form of therapy. If you have the energy for it, give it a try. Put scanxiety on the back burner.

Birding

Birding can get you in nature which reduces stress by lowering blood pressure and stress hormones. But it can help even if you can’t get outside. Try a bird feeder with a camera or downloading the Merlin app and identifying bird songs through an open window.

Gardening

If you enjoy getting your hands dirty, gardening is a great way to reduce anxiety. It’s rewarding to see plants grow and flowers bloom and know that you had a part in making something beautiful happen. It’s also satisfying to grow your own vegetables and cook. Planning your garden in the off season can also relieve stress.

Gaming

If you prefer to—or need to—stay indoors, video games provide a distraction from worry too. We have a tendency to view things negatively when they are actually quite helpful, and video gaming is one of those things thatbis too easily criticized. Whether you like Fallout 4 or Animal Crossing, play what brings you joy.

Small Comforts

Sip tea while reading a cozy mystery under a weighted blanket. Maybe play soothing rain sounds on your noise machine. Watch your favorite TV show. Whatever comforts you after a long day at the office can also comfort you during a bout of scanxiety. Take care of yourself by recognizing your need for downtime.

Personal Connections

isolation can make anxiety worse, so maintaining social connections is important. Whether you need to talk about your fears or you need a distraction from them, other people can provide the sense of community you need.

Support Groups

Support groups are an opportunity to be with people who get it. In addition to feeling less lonely, isolated or judged, it can be helpful to talk to someone not immediately affected by your illness, because sometimes feeling like a burden is a burden.

Family and Friends

The people who know you best can sometimes make you feel your best. Keep a standing date for game night or movie night or pizza night or whatever it is that you and your people enjoy. During that time scanxiety probably won’t find a seat at the table.

Social Media

If you can’t physically get to a support group meeting, social media can be a lifesaver. From Facebook groups to cancer-related hashtags, empathy and advice are available 24/7 because someone is always listening.

Mundane Chores

Doing the dishes or folding the laundry can give you a sense of accomplishment. The distracrion and hit of dopamine might be just what you need to get out of your own head until your anxiety wanes.

For many, it’s waiting for the results to come in that’s the most difficult. If you’re in that boat, you’re not alone. Don’t be afraid to ask for the help you need.

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7 Signs of a Bad Doctor

7 Signs of a Bad Doctor

I’m sharing personal anecdotes with these 7 signs of a bad doctor for a few reasons:

First, I want you to know that if you’ve got a crummy doc, you’re not alone. So many people can relate. (The hashtag #DoctorsAreD*ckheads existed on Twitter for a reason!)

Second, it might help you see warning signs in your own care. Maybe you just don’t like your doctor; maybe your doctor is genuinely terrible.

Remember: doctors, like anyone else, are not good just because they chose a profession of prestige and authority. They still have to be competent at what they do—just like the rest of us.

So what are the 7 signs of a bad doctor?

  1. Your Doctor Doesn’t Listen
  2. Your Doctor Blames You
  3. Your Doctor Makes You Feel Rushed
  4. Your Doctor Doesn’t Ask Clarifying Questions
  5. Your Doctor Takes It Personally When Medications and Treatments Fail
  6. Your Doctor Isn’t Personable
  7. Your Doctor has Bad Patient Reviews

7 Signs of Your Doctor Sucks

1. A Bad Doctor Doesn’t Listen

The worst doctor I ever had—The Rheumatologist from Hell™—would barely make eye contact with me. He was always scribbling something in my chart, unengaged and uttering only the perfunctory mm-hmm. At a time when I felt afraid and unsure, this was definitely not helpful.

I let his board know it, too. (Please report bad doctors whose actions cause you actual harm.)

Was he a terrible diagnostician or just bad at relating to me? Either way, I paid a significant price as a chronic pain patient, and I wonder now how many others did too. It’s a big deal and harmful—sometimes life-threatening—to be ignored. Ask me how I know.

2. A Bad Doctor Blames You

There were only so many times I could be told that diet and exercise were my problem before I realized the doctor was making my problem worse by taking the easy out.

As it turns out, all these years later, I’ve still never read a single article confirming that I wouldn’t have brain cancer if I’d just managed to lose 15 pounds. It’s bullshit, but it was fed to me repeatedly.

Sometimes the doctor’s admonition is what it is—fear of fat. Sometimes the extra weight is a result of disability and immobility. Sometimes food is the only scrap of comfort available precisely because no one will listen.

Me, bloated and fat from the dexamethasone, on the last day of radiation for my brain tumor. I am surrounded by my family.

The why doesn’t change this truth:

A failure to see any other possibility or acknowledge an inability to diagnose your condition in spite of an “unideal” weight is a red flag. No one knows everything, and any doctor who can’t accept their imperfection is doing patients a huge disservice.

3. A Bad Doctor Makes You Feel Rushed

The worst doctors I’ve had made me feel like they had somewhere else—maybe even somewhere better—to be. 

It hasn’t happened to me a lot, mostly because I’ve been waiting so long in uncomfortable chairs that I’m the one who wants out of there, fast. But when it happens, it’s not subtle. It distracts me from outlining my numerous symptoms, which I have a hard time recounting due to health-related anxieties.

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4. A Bad Doctor Doesn’t Ask Clarifying Questions

While I’m relaying my symptoms, I expect my doctor to ask clarifying questions. If I could diagnose myself and knew exactly what was important to share, I would probably just ask for the right tests from the start and save myself a lot of money and a lot of heartache, right?

If I say something like “this hurts” and my doctor wants to know the whens and hows of the pain, I feel much more confident that vital information is being considered. And who doesn’t want a shorter trip to diagnosis because all the facts are being considered, not just the easy ones?

Me and my husband, Dan, celebrating his birthday in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

5.  A Bad Doctor Takes It Personally When Medications and Treatments Fail

I write a lot about The Rheumatologist from Hell™, but it’s because he so effortlessly did so much emotional damage that I have to work to undo all these years later. Present me wants to scream, “This isn’t about you! Don’t bill me for this crap!”

When Cymbalta (duloxetine) didn’t make me feel better, my old rheumatologist didn’t pivot or refer me to someone he thought might be able to help, he doubled down. He told me I’d hurt more if I didn’t take what he prescribed, and essentially blamed me for non-compliance before I was non-compliant.

6. A Bad Doctor isn’t Personable

Sometimes doctors are emotionally cold and you leave feeling less than human. These are bad doctors, no question about it. 

There is a certain level of detachment that’s completely appropriate, but if you walk away feeling less than or othered, it’s not you. More than anything I want you to know it’s not you.

7. A Bad Doctor has Bad Patient Reviews

A single bad review isn’t necessarily a reason not to see a doctor. We all know a lot of complicated factors determine which offices we end up visiting.

Doctors and patients can have bad days, and patients might be more likely to leave complaints on review sites when that happens.

But if you find a lot of reviews addressing the same problems repeatedly, that’s a sign you’ve got a bad doctor. When I feel like I don’t have a choice but to see a physician with a lot of negative feedback, at least I know what I’m walking into. There’s some solace in that.

Reporting a bad doctor for me is a moral imperative. But it’s equally important to share my good experiences too. It takes me only a few minutes to let other patients know what they can expect.

Pro Tip: for reviews, search for your provider on websites like Healthgrades and Vitals.

Share You Experiences with Bad Doctors in the Comments

Those are my own personal 7 signs of a bad doctor. I’ve probably missed some helpful stuff though. Let us all know what warnings you would add to the list by leaving a comment, and read about my fantastic new primary doctor.

PS: if you’re stuck with a bad doctor and trying to make the best of a bad situation, maybe this article will help: How to Get Your Doctor to Listen

PPS: If you need help relaxing because your doctor is lousy, try making weed butter or learning how to Zentangle! (Wink, wink.)

The Divine Dove Zentangle Design

The Divine Dove Zentangle Design

Things have been going…well, I guess just going here Iately. Father’s Day is tomorrow, and I have lots of feelings, but I don’t feel compelled to write about them. I decided I’d try the Divine Dove Zentangle design.

I’d rather Zentangle.

So, I wasn’t intending to, but I accidentally got the June 2021 “Ethereal Desert” subscription box from Archer & Olive. The box included an A5 notebook with kraft paper in it.

There’s no grid or lines printed on the pages, so I thought maybe it would be a good art journal. A place for me to test things, make notes about what I like, have a little therapy time without the burden of posting and editing video, and come up with some ideas that I might turn into my own tutorials for Patrons.

Wanting to put something down on the toned paper immediately, the first thing I drew was some Zen-scribbling with a white Gelly Roll pen when I was feeling all moody about cancer.

And the second thing I drew was the Divine Dove by Romi Marks, TangledYogi 333—a tangle she designed that is a celebration of life. Fitting for me in this moment. I think I have mentioned this before, but I have been really into her YouTube channel since I took the Jesse Lane art class last month and learned more about using my Prismacolor pencils because she tends to color instead of shade everything with graphite.

In the tutorial, she colors the background between the dove and the flowers where the random tipple orbs are floating. I opted to leave that section untouched. I do love using the white colored pencil to highlight and add dimension relatively effortlessly.

TangledYogi 333 works on a hexagon tile. So I sketched in a hexagon lightly with pencil and later erased the guides. (Tip for creating a hexagon: draw a circle, mark points on the circle every 60 degrees, then draw straight lines connecting those points to close off the hexagon shape.)

I used the colors she uses in the video, but it’s neat to compare the difference in the appearance of the colors on the white paper she used versus the kraft paper I used.

The lighting is weird, but this is the color key I drew in the same notebook, so I could easily refer to them if I want to use them again for another tangle. (Btw, I have a colored pencil board on Pinterest if you’re looking for inspiration for your Zentangle art. Some of the pins include reference pictures with the specific Prismacolor pencils used—which is super handy.)

Materials Used

Archer and Olive A5 Kraft Notebook
Helix circle maker and ruler (for setting up the hexagonal guides)
Graphite pencil (for sketching the design)
Kneaded eraser (for lifting graphite without damaging the paper’s surface)
Micron black 05 pen
Prismacolor Premier pencils (PC 909, PC 1100, PC 1008, PC 1009, PC 1001, PC 930, PC 912, PC 1006, PC 1065, PC 938)
Gelly Roll white 08 pen

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You might also like: How to Draw Zentangles One Zentangle a Day

How to Get Your Doctor to Listen

How to Get Your Doctor to Listen

As a patient with chronic pain who was undiagnosed and then misdiagnosed (they told me I had fibromyalgia but it was a brain tumor) for years, I learned a thing or two about how to get your doctor to listen to you.

Going through life with a misdiagnosis—or no diagnosis at all—is as hard to bear as whatever’s ailing you. Not everyone is born a self-advocate. It’s something we must learn and practice.

So here’s what I’ve learned. I sincerely hope it can help you too.

Why Your Doctor Isn’t Helping

It may be that your doctor, though well-intentioned, isn’t picking up on what you’re telling her. Or maybe you’re not communicating as clearly as is needed. Or, you know, maybe your doctor is just an asshole. (I’m telling you some of them are.) For me, it was a little bit of everything.

First, let me assure you that if you are currently facing this struggle, there’s a good chance it’s not your fault. There’s also a good chance you’re a woman. Doctors not listening to female patients is a thing, and the problem of sexism in health care is long-running and systemic.

According to Prevention, for example, women are 50% more likely than men to get a wrong diagnosis after experiencing a heart attack, and hysteria wasn’t removed from the DSM until 1980.

Nineteen-freaking-eighty!

But as the world can attest, cutting ridiculous junk from a manual doesn’t automagically remove stigma and prejudice from a profession or a populace. From psychology to surgery, health care is still plagued by crap assumptions that undermine the care of women.

And it’s not just the old white guys who are guilty of perpetuating harm—women doctors do it to women patients, families and friends do it to people they love.

We. Do. It. To. Ourselves.

My Chronic Illness Misdiagnosis

For me, the trouble started because I was a woman in my thirties presenting with chronic pain. It was generalized, meaning I hurt everywhere not just my elbow or my neck. And because the pain prevented me from being active, I was also gaining weight.

Before a single drop of blood was taken, a nurse practitioner told me I probably had fibromyalgia. I was tested for arthritis and a handful of autoimmune issues straight away, then referred to a rheumatologist the following week.

When the blood test results were wholly unremarkable, the rheumatologist presumed me to just be a pudgy, complaining woman in need of antidepressants.

Unsurprisingly, he officially diagnosed me with fibro, a condition with a unique and horrifying stigma all its own. And when his (mis)treatment plan failed to help me, he put the blame squarely on my shoulders. His demeanor toward me turned hostile, he communicated with me like I was an ignorant, troublemaking child, and he was outright belligerent when I asked him questions.

How dare a uterus-having technical writer ask if maybe Cymbalta wasn’t The Answer.

That’s when I knew without a doubt my rheumatologist was a lazy stinking misogynist, which brings me to my first bit of advice.

Tip 1: Fire All the Assholes

Yes, I know what I’m saying is very difficult to do in a lot of cases. Restrictive insurance networks, a limited number of doctors and specialists in your area, and sheer exhaustion from your chronic illness can make finding a new doctor all but impossible. But your health is the thing, and you can’t protect it if you keep leaving it in the hands of an asshole.

Cry because it’s hard and unfair. Absolutely do that. But then remember that you don’t have to solve the problem in one day. Promise yourself to look for a better option and jump at the opportunity when you find it.

Tip 2: Expect Struggles with Good Doctors Too

Not all my doctors were so lazy and horrible, but by the time I was ready to give another doctor a try, Dr. Asshole had already done his worst. The wrong diagnosis stuck to me like toilet paper to a shoe.

He was given the benefit of the doubt at every subsequent doctor appointment I had for the following two and half YEARS, and at least a dozen more MDs and PAs and NPs tried their best to persuade me I really did have fibromyalgia after his misdiagnosis.

It’s maddening if you think about it too long, but medical professionals—even fired ones—are always presumed to know more about being sick than the people who are sick. You’ll need to mentally prepare yourself for this reality before every appointment.

Tip 3: Take a Break

Meanwhile, I continued experiencing symptoms that didn’t really fit with fibro. The unexplained haunted me, and I got sicker. I surfed WebMD and Dr. Google and tried to diagnosis myself. When I asked doctors about the things I’d learned, it didn’t go well. If I wasn’t ridiculed on the exam table, I was politely ignored.

There were days when I felt like I just couldn’t do it anymore, so I didn’t. I took time off from going to appointments and even scheduling appointments until I recovered enough strength to deal with more heartache from doctors—people I was taught to trust with my life. I told myself I’d go again when I had the energy to communicate without bursting into tears.

And, yes, I did break down a few times. It’s inevitable, dear human. Don’t beat yourself up about it like I did.

Tip 4: Ask To Rule Out Diagnoses

I had infinitely more productive appointments when I stopped asking “Could it be X?” and started asking “Can we rule out X?” I don’t see why such a subtle change should matter so much, but it did.

Doctors were less likely to see me as a difficult, self-diagnoser and more likely to see me as a diagnostic partner when I asked if we could rule something out instead of confirm it. In fact, no one bothered to order a single MRI until I asked, “Can we rule out MS?”

Folks, that first MRI is how they found my brain tumor. Or, as I see it, how *I* found my brain tumor.

Tip 5: Recognize Internalized Bullshit

We can be our own worst enemy when we take in and internalize bad messages from external sources. Sexist and ableist ideals can ooze out of us without our realizing it. We can be gaslit by medical pros without seeing the harm because we’re taught to treat them as authority figures or saviors instead of trained diagnosticians paid to do a job.

Mull it over for a bit and see if you’ve fallen into traps that affect your ability to self-advocate.

  • Do you hear yourself as a reporter of facts or a complainer when you tell a doctor your symptoms?
  • Do you think all your problems would go away if you could just lose the weight?
  • Do you always think you’re sick because you’re depressed and not depressed because you’re sick?

That asshole rheumatologist I mentioned before? He’d only ever seen me fat and just assumed I was lazy and overeating. He had no idea that less than a year before I was running 5Ks on the treadmill or completing a Jillian Michaels’s Shred workout in my basement five times a week.

Still, I had to fight like hell not to let him gaslight me. He nearly had me convinced I was fat and lazy and my pain was imagined.

Tip 6: Take Someone with You

I’m as independent as the day is long, and I’ll tell you I hated bringing my husband to appointments with me at first. Not because I minded him being there, but because IT SHOULDN’T FUCKING BE NECESSARY. (Ahem, sorry. This will always be a sensitive subject for me.)

However, when I couldn’t put my own underwear on or get myself out of the bathtub anymore, I relented and asked him to join me at my next appointment. Being stubborn about it might’ve killed me, looking back on it. Anyway, having a man in the room changed the way all my doctors behaved. Some definitely more than others.

Turns out it would later become absolutely essential for Dan to attend my appointments. The point is that I probably should have asked sooner than I did, given how the world works.

Tip 7: Connect with Other Patients

I know there are patients out there with different perspectives who have learned things I haven’t. I encourage you to seek them out. There’s an entire community of doctors and patients online who are constantly sharing what they know. Seek them out.

And if all else fails—and sometimes it does—try weed.

Fibromyalgia Misdiagnosis: Surprise, It’s a Brain Tumor

Fibromyalgia Misdiagnosis: Surprise, It’s a Brain Tumor

Whew! The past 72 hours have been utter shit for me. I’d explain why, but I’m going to tap my Tumor! sign and leave it at that. There’s something else I want to write about now: my chronic illness and my fibromyalgia misdiagnosis.

Did you know that May is Brain Tumor Awareness Month and Fibromyalgia Awareness Month? (Actually, May is the awareness month for a lot of chronic illnesses, but these two things in particular have been just about my entire life since October 2014, so they are getting top billing on my blog on this lovely May Day.)

Fibromyalgia: Misdiagnosis?

I mentioned in a previous blog post that I believe fibromyalgia was a misdiagnosis for me as opposed to a comorbidity. As I have discussed many times with family and friends, I am mostly overjoyed to have an accurate diagnosis and a real plan to get better.

However.

There’s a special kind of emotional baggage I picked up on this chronic pain path, and the only way I know to heal from it is to put it out in the universe by sharing it on my blog—where my family, friends, and even complete strangers get to read some of my most intimate thoughts.

Article: Ultimate Guide to Helping a Loved One with Brain Cancer

I have no qualms about oversharing when it comes to my well-being, in case that wasn’t already abundantly clear.

So here’s the deal. On February 2, 2017 I had fibromyalgia. Then on February 3, 2017 I officially had a six-centimeter tumor on my brain stem.

On February 2 the general consensus among my numerous doctors was that I wasn’t eating right or exercising enough. If I were, I’d experience improvement and maybe even remission of some of my symptoms.

On February 3 the general consensus among my doctors was “Holy, shit. You shouldn’t be able to do that” or “No wonder your body can’t walk, breathe, sleep, digest, or stabilize your heart rate and blood pressure like a person without a brain tumor.”

At first I was like, damn I am one tough cookie.

And then I was like, wait just a goddamn minute here.

Misdiagnosis Bottom Line: I felt the same!

I want to point out that from a purely physical experience, there was no discernible difference for me between February 2 to February 3*—even though in that 24 hours, my list of symptoms was suddenly more than validated. I wasn’t just making stuff up or being stubborn about diet and exercise, and it the fibromyalgia misdiagnosis was total crap.

Medical professionals (not speaking of specific doctors right now, just medical pros as a whole-ass community) who were previously dismissive of my chronic pain symptoms were suddenly losing their shit over how believable my reports of chronic pain and disability were.

And this is a point that I really want to drive home, so I’m going to repeat it:

The physical experience of living inside this tired, broken body didn’t change one iota for me in that time. All that changed was who believed me.

And somehow I went from being a whining, complaining exaggerator with two X-chromosomes to a human being who really had been experiencing unrelenting level-eight pain for TWO AND A HALF YEARS.

(I am so angry thinking about it! I might get over it one day, but not this day!)

charlie_brown_pain_scale

(My Spoonie friends are grabbing the box of tissues right now. They are empathizing so hard.)

(Others might not quite understand just how much emotional damage was done. That’s okay.)

It makes me angry that I wasn’t taken seriously. It makes me sad that treatment (and possibly relief) could have come just a little bit sooner for me, but instead I spent months homebound.

The lazy-ass rheumatologist that was a little too eager to diagnose me with fibromyalgia in 2014 fought me over my symptoms and complaints of weight gain, insisting that I wasn’t exercising enough.

When I told him that I’d been tracking my steps, walking to and from work, walking three laps at the park after work every night, and using my FitDesk and hand weights at home and was experiencing physical decline instead of improvement, his response was “Well, you need to start out slower and build up.”

SERIOUSLY?

That’s all the motherfucker had. I must have been doing it wrong. Could be that fibromyalgia was a misdiagnosis.

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Now that I have proof of this brain tumor (grade 2 Astrocytoma, can’t remember if I mentioned that) and I am recovering from surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, I hear admonishments not to “overdo” when I tell the doctors and nurses that I’m walking without mobility aids or putting in 30 minutes (on the lowest resistance setting, for the love of god) on my FitDesk as I try to recover.

If you don’t immediately know why both of these experiences fill me with boiling rage, I’ll tell you: NEITHER VALIDATES THAT I KNOW THE PHYSICAL LIMITS OF MY OWN DAMN BODY.

And yeah, the anger that comes with that weasels its way into my waking hours from time to time. You got a problem with that?


*I implore you to think about this before you accuse someone with a fibromylagia (misdiagnosis or diagnosis) of being an attention-seeker, a pill popper, or a conjurer of fake maladies. It hurts us all, and keeps the counterproductive stigma alive.

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Medical Marijuana: The First Time I Got High

Medical Marijuana: The First Time I Got High

So far, I’ve received three questions about medical marijuana via my contact form. All three were variations of: Does medical marijuana make you high? 

I’m answering this based on my personal experience with marijuana, just to be clear. What follows is NOT an answer to Does medical marijuana make one high? or Will medical marijuana make me high?

TL;DR answer: Yeah, sometimes.

The first three times I took medical cannabis, I used THC-infused Indica gummies. Each time I took one half of a gummy with food before bed, and I did not get high. The fourth time I took half a gummy on an empty stomach while ill (and probably pretty dehydrated) and I got high as fuck.

***

A short time ago, Dan and I traveled to Indiana for a funeral. I was sad, anxious about traveling with chronic pain and IBS, and (as usual) ignoring my body’s attempts to warn me to be kind to myself.

We were on the road at dinner time, which meant stopping for a bite along the way. I had a baked potato and a vanilla Frosty from Wendy’s. Maybe not the healthiest meal, nutritionally speaking. But at the time all I was hoping for was “not spicy” and “hopefully not tainted.”

A baked potato and vanilla shake seemed like my best options on a strip of road where burgers, onion rings, tacos, roast beef, chili, fried chicken, and 12-hour-old wilted salads were my other options.

We met up with family at the funeral home. I hugged my parents and extended family and took a seat at the back of the room, as close to the restroom as possible while still being present for the service.

Aside from my usual aches and pains and moderate vertigo when standing up, I made it through the service without incident. I hobbled down a few stairs to the parking lot, and we left for home.

The cramping didn’t start until we had been on the road home for about an hour. “Dan, you are officially being warned. Take the next exit where I can access a public restroom.” I clutched my gut and loosened my seat belt.

I prayed to no one in particular that I would make it. “Also, pull the car right up to the fucking door please.”

Dan obliged. I made it. As far as anyone else knew, I was just a regular traveler taking a break to answer the gentle (ha!) calls of nature.

(Funny story: when my IBS was at its absolute worst, I’d run to the bathroom at home, slam the door shut, and sing “Looks like we made it…” at the top of my lungs. A signal to Dan that things were going to be OK—not good, but OK—and a reminder to myself to laugh.)

We were back on the interstate. Home was less than an hour away. I sighed, relieved.

***

Three blocks from our house, I cried out in pain. The cramps were back. I took rhythmic breaths through clenched teeth. “I need to get home. Now.”

Dan gave the car a little more gas. We were doing 45 mph on a 25 mph street, coming up on a red light.

Turn green. Turn green. Turn green. FUCKING TURN GREEN ALREADY.

“Dammit!” I yelled as Dan brought the car to a halt at the intersection. He was doing the best he could.

Hee hee. Hoo Hoo. Hee hee. Hoo hoo.

We were moving again, but there was a four-way stop a few hundred feet in front of us. Cars were queued, waiting for their turn. There was no way Dan could just roll through this one.

“I’m not going to make it,” I said.

We were literally a block from home, and I started crying.

***

I showered and cleaned up on my own. The only pair of dress pants I owned went in a garbage bag. I put on my pajamas and crawled into bed. Everything hurt, I was deeply embarrassed, and I was emotionally spent. I reached for the medical marijuana, knowing it would dull the sharp edges of my pain, calm my gut, and help me sleep—just like the first three times I had taken it.

***

Thirty minutes later I reached for the glass of water on the table beside me. “Why is my arm doing that?” I giggled.

“Doing what?” Dan asked.

“Look. I have a Go-Go-Gadget arm. It’s reaching too far and I can’t pick up the glass.”

“Oh my god. You are so stoned right now.”

***

“That is so cool,” I said. “When I close my eyes the things I think in my brain are cartoons!”

***

“What’s so funny now?” Dan asked.

“There are strings around my lips and in my cheeks. Someone is pulling them! I can’t make my face unsmile! Turn on Bob Ross!”

***

“Dan? I’m having really intense deja vu. Also, how many Modern Family episodes are they showing tonight? Jesus.”

“This is still the first one.”

***

“I know why hippies are hippies. If we give mean people weed, they can love everyone too. Like I do.”

***

“Take a look! It’s in a book! A reading rainboooooooww!”

***

“Dan?”

“Yeah?”

“Why can’t everyone who’s sick have medical marijuana? I want everyone to have weed. I love weed.”

“Maybe one day.”

“Dan?”

“Yeah, Love?”

“Nothing hurts.”


NOTE: I have chosen not to take medical marijuana while I try to evaluate the effectiveness of the gabapentin the doctor just put me on. I still have a few posts in the queue, however.

Related: How to make crock pot cannabutter

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