76 Resources for Writers (updated 2024)

76 Resources for Writers (updated 2024)

Before you get started, a few notes on the links. First of all, I don’t necessarily use or outright endorse all of these resources for writers myself. Thing is, in compiling this list I started thinking, “Who am I to judge what is helpful for other writers?” My goal is to provide you with a starting point for online exploration, not tell you what to do. So if you hate some of this stuff? Fine, not my fault! If you love it? I take full credit!

There really is a lot of stuff here. I recommend bookmarking this page. Come back any time to browse, because it took me days to compile and it’s not going anywhere.

If you’re self-publishing, don’t miss my warnings about iUniverse and Author Solutions.

Writing Prompts

Sometimes it’s not the writing that’s tricky. Sometimes it’s picking something to write about. Use these links for exploring different writing prompts for your blog, your personal journal, or even your next novel.

1800+ Creative Writing Prompt: From the folks at Reedsy. (You might also like the cloud wordprocessing software they offer.)

Plinky: Writing prompts change daily. You can upload images and then share your response on your blog or social media accounts.

Writer’s Digest Promptly Blog: Look for prompts every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Includes flash-fiction prompts, activities and some Q&As.

Writing Prompts for Sci-Fi & Fantasy Lovers: A static page with 15 different Sci-Fi & Fantasy prompts to try. Don’t miss the other prompts for poetry and creative writing.

Technology Inspired Prompts: Another page from Writing Forward. I just couldn’t resist.

Red Writing Hood:  Fiction or non-fiction writing meme. Prompts are posted Tuesdays, and you can link up your posts on Fridays.

Mama Kat’s Pretty Much World Famous Writing Prompts: Weekly writing prompts and link-up for networking with other writers and bloggers.

Help for Fiction Writers

It doesn’t matter what part of the writing process has you stumped, it can be so frustrating to hit a wall. These writer’s resources for fiction writers get you through some of writing’s major challenges.

Guide to Literary Agents: Writer’s Digest blog written by Robert Lee Brewer. A must read if you’re ready to query.

Kurt Vonnegut’s Tips for Writing Fiction: How could I not include something Vonnegut? He was born in Indianapolis. Eight short rules to make you a better writer.

5 Ways Not to Write a Novel: Sometimes we learn what to do; sometimes we learn what not to do. Number 2 on the list is one of my personal pet peeves. (Yet, sometimes I still catch myself doing it.)

Character Profile Form: Simple, but oh-so-handy tool for creating memorable characters.

101 of the Best Fiction Writing Tips: A four-part series on Write it Sideways. Basically another link round-up like this one. (Hint: bookmark posts like these for browsing later.)

9 Questions to Create a Novel: Using these 9 questions, authors can clarify the scope of their work and identify themes.

Regional Vocabularies: Yes, I linked to a Wikipedia article. Just my way of suggesting that you do some research to make your characters’ dialogue truly authentic.

General Writing

These writer’s resources are potentially helpful and inspirational no matter what you write. Some funny and unorthodox, some straight-laced and in your face.

50 of the Best Websites for Writers: EduChoice.org has compiled a pretty extensive list of links broken down by category—some obvious sites listed here, some not so obvious.

How to Use an Apostrophe: Oh yes I did, because I love the Oatmeal. If you already know how to use an apostrophe, then have a chuckle or two.

The Hot Author Report: I notice THAR is not currently accepting reviews, but you can still jump to the query page to request a feature. Couldn’t hurt, right?

101 Tips to Overcome Writer’s Block: I usually just read, but find what works for you. Tons of stuff to try, but #25 seems pretty damn scary if you ask me.

30 Books to Read Before You’re 30: Good writers read. A lot. How many of these have you read so far?

Ambiguous Word List: Some words are more flexible than others. This rather nifty little list sorts words from most to least flexible and allows you to more info on synonyms, hypernyms and hyponyms. Cool for word nerds.

I Write Like: Just plain fun. Copy and paste text from your WIP or your blog and find out who you write like. (Apparently, I write like H.P. Lovecraft, 20th century master of weird fiction.)

Plague Words and Phrases: They make it sound so medieval, don’t they? Just some junky and clunky phrases to avoid in your writing.

13 Writing Tips: I know, I know. Everyone has writing tips. But these aren’t just any writing tips; these are Chuck Palahniuk’s writing tips.

Tip of My Tongue: I’ve filed this one under “Things I Wish I’d Thought Of.” Looking for a word, but you just can’t get your brain to recall it? There just might be a way to find it after all. (There’s also an app.)

Why Copying Inspires Creativity: Think of Finding Forrester and maybe try copying a bit of something the next time you get stuck.

Manage Your Writing: The blog of my editing professor at IUPUI, Kenneth W. Davis, this site offers practical advice for sprucing up your business writing. (Hint: lots of these tips can be applied broadly across genres.)

Letter Writers Alliance: Writing improves with practice, and letters are a great way to practice. A blog friend of mine turned me on to this site. The LWA is no more, but the site is archived for posterity.

57 Tips for Writers, From Writers: King, Grisham, Hemingway—your favorite authors are all here to help you out.

Critique.org Workshops: If you really want to be an excellent writer, you want feedback on your work. Just one place you might look for peer review.

11 Stupidest Writing Mistakes: I love this post for the subheadings alone—constipated clauses, comma vomit, the death of adverbs, etc. etc. etc.

10 Grammar Rules You Can (And Should) Ignore: Breaking the rules of grammar is so much fun. It’s also very effective if you break the rules thoughtfully. As a linguistics minor and a language liberal, I heart this page.

Funds for Writers: A whole website dedicated to finding grants and other ways to financially support your dreams.

Poets & Writers: Lots of stuff to check out here, but I wanted to draw your attention to the fact that they maintain databases of creative writing contests and grants, MFA programs, and literary journals.

Freelance Writing

If you’re looking to pad your wallet or put food on the table, freelance writing is a viable career. (Just ask me, I know!) These writer’s resources for freelance writers can help you write better, find better jobs, and earn more money.

Word Count: Freelancing in the Digital Age: This is just one of those all-around good sites for information on freelance writing. Includes a weekly recommended reading feature, I think you’ll find helpful.

Freelance Writing Jobs: I get asked about 100 times per week where people can find freelance writing jobs. Here’s one place.

PoeWar: And here’s another place you might find some freelance writing job leads.

How to Create a Client Pricing Package: Overall, Freelance Folder is a great resource. I picked this post in particular, because freelance writers—yes, even some veterans—tend to fret about setting fees.

Networking, Classes & Workshops

Networking, classes, and writer’s workshops are invaluable. Some are free, some aren’t. Ultimately, it’s up to you to investigate and find the opportunity that helps you achieve your goals and fits into your budget and schedule.

The Freelance Writers Den: A subscription-based site for freelancers with an emphasis on learning how to earn more through webinars, articles, handouts, and teleclasses.

Gotham Writers’ Workshop: Online and NYC-based workshops for just about every kind of writer. Looks like classes run about $300.

Tameri Guide for Writers: Writing workshop and seminar materials offered online. I think this could be a great resource for building your own local workshop with writers in your area.

Critique Circle: Workshops and critiques for all types of writers. I suggest checking out the FAQ page to get information about how the site works.

10 Amazing Free Online Writing Courses: From Freelance Folder, these 10 courses focus on freelance writing skills with courses on marketing writing, journalism, and web writing.

The Crafty Writer’s Creative Writing Course: Another free online course. This one is offered by Fiona Veitch Smith and is designed for beginning writers.

Starting Your Author Blog

Lots of authors blog as a way to market themselves and their works, but also as a way to develop a writing habit. Here you’ll find blogging resources that give you inspiration and questions to ponder.

Creative Something: This site isn’t just for bloggers, but it certainly works for bloggers. It’s a great reading if you’re looking for creative inspiration.

The Author’s Dilemma: To Blog or Not to Blog: Blog, Silly! There’s no question (at least in my mind). However, this article considers blogging styles and weighs the pros and cons for authors.

Three Keys to Successful Author Blogging: Some of these tips might seem obvious, but there are plenty of authors out there new to blogging. Consider your content focus, interacting with readers, and collaborating.

The Best Author Blogs: Another page from The Internet Writing Journal, this is a nice, compact list of author blogs you might want to follow.

31 Days to Building a Better Blog: ProBlogger has a newer version of the 31 day challenge, but the one I’ve linked to is free. You’re welcome.

Five Reasons Why Blogging Improves Your Writing: I agree enthusiastically. I can attest to all five of these points personally, and feel that #1 is the most important thing for writers.

Blogs By Writers

While compiling this list, Dan asked me, “How are author blogs resources for writers?” Hmph. How are they not?

Beverly Lewis

Charles Stross

Cory Doctorow

Erik Larson

Erin Morgenstern

Erin O’Brien

Frederik Pohl

Heather Massey

John Scalzi

Justine Larbalestier

Meg Cabot

Michael Ruhlman

Neil Gaiman

P.C. Hodgell

Paolo Bacigalupi

Ransom Riggs

Rick Riordan

Steve Salerno

Terry Pierce

Valerie Frankel

Miscellaneous Resources for Writers

Other random tidbits of information I didn’t want to pass up.
Ghostwriting for Beginners: Who doesn’t want to learn something from the Grumpy Old Bookman? Learn what you never knew you never knew about ghostwriting.

Writing Your Own Cookbook: Just a few helpful hints from from the blog of David Lebovitz on preparing to compile and publish your recipes in a cookbook.

Inkspot.com: If you’re looking for somewhere to host your writing portfolio online, this could work. Site is hosted by Writing.com.

7 Great Online Research Resources for Writers: Research is essential to writing well, even outside of the classroom. These suggested research resources come from Daily Writing Tips.

Resources for Children’s Writers: A pretty thorough list of resources for children’s authors created by Rachelle Burk. She covers it all from self-publishing to illustrators and images.

What’s Your Point of View: First person? Third person omniscient? What does it all mean? Exploring and discussing points of view in literature.

Query Letter Checklist: If you’re ready to start querying agents, check out Janet Reid’s Query Letter Checklist before you send. Short but sweet checklist of everything you should include.

A Disappointing Lack of Candy Coffee

A Disappointing Lack of Candy Coffee

I didn’t order a candy coffee with my breakfast this morning. (“Candy coffee” is what my dad called coffee with anything in it that actually made it taste good. He wanted his plain.) I contemplated it, but I slept so well last night, I couldn’t sabotage myself with caffeine today.

Now, if insomnia visits me tonight anyway, I will truly be pissed.

It’s funny because when I was younger, I’d drink caffeine all day long and still sleep so well. But I inadvertently got off the sauce during treatment when everything tasted awful, and now I’m hypersensitive to the stuff.

As the kids say, fuck cancer.

I’ve been tweaking the website and trying to find more affiliate partners the past couple of days, but it’s a pretty slow process. None of these sites are optimized for mobile devices, and it’s a real headache trying to use them on my phone.

Aside: If you’re reading this, ShareASale and Commission Junction, make a mobile app. Pronto. Us disableds deserve easier navigation.

Anyhoo, I realized it has already been two weeks since I sent those e-mail queries for Who You Gonna Believe. I sent about 7 emails total, and so far I’ve just heard back from the one. I have no expectations, though, I’m just reporting in for anyone who’s curious where that stands.

With my new health insurance allowance for OTC stuff, I have ordered compression socks. I got the seamstress tape out and measured my calves and everything. I don’t know if it will help my muscle fatigue or not, but I’m always a little hopeful about these things. I have to be.

Speaking of health insurance, Dan’s old coverage is still in effect. So the appointment we were worried about was covered. At least until the insurance company recognizes their mistake. But I’m not telling those jerks anything. They can figure it out themselves. I figure they owe him a lot more for their previous coverage denials than that one appointment could possibly cost.

Related: the stress of the coverage conundrum had his blood pressure all over the place to the befuddlement of his primary care physician. (The one he likes that he can’t see anymore because he has new insurance.) “This is what anger and uncertainty does. I’ve been stressing about this for a week.”

Put that shit on a bumper sticker.

Say it louder for the people in the back.

One hundred percent.

Meryl Streep standing ovation dot GIF.

Remember the iUniverse Scam?

Remember the iUniverse Scam?

Remember that iUniverse scam reporting I did in the tweens? Or should I say scams reporting? I’m bringing all of those posts back. Yes, they’re over a decade old, but it occurred to me that importing that work here might serve a few purposes.

First, it validates all the extensive research and writing I did on Author Solutions and iUniverse at the time. And there are a lot of articles. I know because I just spent a lot of time editing links on The Complete Index of iUniverse and Author Solutions Complaints.

Second, it helps me bridge the before-cancer and after-cancer identities I sometimes have difficulty connecting. I need a project, kids.

So tell your friends, because I’ve already been hit with bot traffic for this. I’m not sure if it’s a nefarious keyword war and Author Solutions is trying to take out what it sees as competition or if it’s a DDoS attack or what.

What I do know is how to block bad traffic.

Finally, as you know, I’ve been pondering how to make this site pay for itself (and maybe an MRI) and all of my old content should be helping me more. When I started over here, I saved my old stuff to a WordPress.com site. I lost a lot of the images from that time, but the text is here. And so am I.

Literary Agent Rejection Letter

Literary Agent Rejection Letter

I got my first literary agent rejection letter on Sunday, and I feel so alive. I’m not sure that’s a normal response for writers to have. I think I’m supposed to feel bitter resentment. But things have been pretty dull here for a while, which severely exacerbates bored depression.

I’ve counted ceiling tiles a few too many times already.

The agent’s email was kind, explaining how Who You Gonna Believe didn’t fit into her current list of working titles. But I still wonder how straightforward the rejections are. 

Like does she genuinely think the manuscript sounds intriguing, or is she just saying that because I have brain cancer and she doesn’t want to hurt my feelings?

I run into the hurt feelings thing a lot, as you might imagine. It doesn’t make me mad. It just makes me wonder. I appreciate that people are trying to be nice, but I also appreciate bluntness because it protects my energy reserves.

I’m probably one of few who would rather hear, “this is not marketable in any universe” than “it’s not for me.” Provided it’s true, of course.

Which is why I was trying to get feedback before querying in the first place. I thought it would save me the agony of deciphering. I was protecting myself.

By the way, I rejected all of those proposals I mentioned previously because I didn’t have the energy to interpret responses. (That’s not a reason listed in Reedsy’s drop-down menu, in case you were wondering.)

That’s the story of my first rejection letter, dull as it is. Maybe one day I will wish I could remember it, but for now it feels very forgettable. It was as impactful as a cookie-cutter reply from HR after submitting the first resume and cover letter of a job search.

The self-doubt comes later.

A Funny Thing Happened

A Funny Thing Happened

Not that long ago, I said I was letting Who You Gonna Believe go. I was tired of treating myself to the trauma. But then a funny thing happened.

My website was doing some serious numbers.* And that got me thinking maybe I should try to do something with this memoir I spent so much time on. Maybe I should try to make something of it. For the traffic gods.

I updated the digital cover, started promoting links and using excerpts to garner interest, and the next thing I know I was reading and proofreading the damn thing. Without angst, without feeling like I was waterboarding myself with toilet water.

I even thought to myself a couple of times that maybe I can write. I was barrelling through chapters like they were well-composed. Or at least well-enough composed. Maybe letting the work stagnate was a bad idea.

Then last night, I had a dream where instead of my ex-husband refusing to leave, he just walked away when I told him to piss off. That never happens!

I was laughing at parts of the story and remembering how much joy and laughter entered my life when Dan showed up.

I think I’m healed?

I’d still like to actually reach people with it. Have someone edit it. Format it for ebook. Turn it into an audiobook. But I’m not really in a position healthwise where I can accomplish any of that, let alone all of it. So I’ll just let those dreams simmer.

Anyhoo, I’m going to continue proofing today and think about how I can get more people to read it. I really do think there’s a there there, if I can just clarify the vision a little.

* Another funny thing happened. Turns out my search numbers were inflated by 4/20, and after everyone was good and high, things settled down some.

How to Write a Memoir in 10 Steps

How to Write a Memoir in 10 Steps

To be perfectly clear, I know this isn’t the most orthodox way to teach someone how to write a memoir in 10 Steps, but I submit that if you’re hung up on the literal how-to’s of writing a memoir, you aren’t really ready.

I don’t feel like diagramming sentences today.

That, and rudimentary how-to articles are largely about giving you the confidence to do a thing anyway. You can absolutely do this thing, but you should prepare first. Because if the surprising stuff turns out not to be a surprise, you’re basically unstoppable.

How to Write a Memoir

1. Get Thick Skin

2. Relive Your Trauma

3. Give People Fake Names

4. Find Enablers

5. Hold a Grudge Loudly

6. Be Discouraged

7. Read Other Memoirs

8. Feel Small

9. Write for Spite

10. Dig Up Your Past

The 10 Steps

1. Get Thick Skin

Forget what others have said about you (well don’t literally forget, you might need the fodder) and be prepared to look at your past self objectively. Lassoing that objectivity is even harder than it sounds, but it’s possible.

There are some faults you’re going to want to absolve yourself of in your writing—for me, naivety and cluelessness topped the list—don’t do it. You have to be willing to let readers see the warts. If your story is going to be relatable—if you’re serious about memoir writing—you must be authentic.

Absolution may still come to you, but not by glossing over the bits you don’t like. Be ready to criticize yourself. A lot.

2. Relive Your Trauma

I wasn’t prepared for the buried trauma that writing a memoir would resurface. I thought I was, but I was kidding myself. I literally had to take breaks and ultimately end my memoir to stop the constant onslaught of PTSD triggers.

3. Give People Fake Names

This is probably obvious, but there’s a certain kind of person you’ll need to write about who still Googles herself 15 years later. To avoid the headaches, just change her name.

Because even your best attempts at keeping ties severed may be thwarted.

My ex-husband actually joined my Patreon even though I did my best to rename people and switch up identifying characteristics. That’s a real thing that happened.

There are legal considerations too, but I am not a lawyer. If you have qualms, hire an attorney, please.

4. Find Enablers

Aside from needing money to pay bills after having brain surgery, there were a couple of motivating factors that kept me writing:

A former employer (who I name-drop in the preface of Who You Gonna Believe) and a couple of online friends behaved in such a way that I believed I could write. 

All of them read my blog at some point and encouraged me to write a memoir. I channeled them when I doubted I could succeed.

5. Hold a Grudge Loudly

There’s a great quote that I have seen floating around the internet attributed to Anne Lamott. (I see it a lot without attribution too, so who knows?) It goes something like: You own everything that’s ever happened to you. If people wanted you to write nicely about them, they should have behaved better.

You might feel like it’s in your best interest to withhold certain facts, but you don’t owe anyone your silence. You hear me?

6. Be Discouraged

Some people will say that memoir writers just want revenge. I, for example, fit the divorcee and undiagnosed cliches, since so much of the story is about my lousy ex-husband and my subsequent long slog to a medical diagnosis.

The naysayers discouraged me, not gonna lie. But then a funny thing happened: I realized they weren’t my readers and weren’t ever going to be my audience. Caring about their opinions was like asking the guy who sells gym memberships if my dress made me look fat.

7. Read Other Memoirs

You might just learn stuff you didn’t know would help you write. My favorite reads while I wrote Who You Gonna Believe were by John Lewis, Jenny Lawson, Leah Remini, and Mary Karr.

By the way, I highly recommend The Art of Memoir by Mary Karr.

Shop Recommended Memoirs

8. Feel Small

The odd thing about memoir writing is that it makes you self-aware. You see that other people have profoundly different stories to tell and feel like maybe your life isn’t that big of a deal. I say that’s a good thing.

Not only did a sense of smallness help me see my trauma as a mouse and not a monster, it helped me relate to my audience in a new way and craft a better story for them.

9. Write for Spite

So maybe spite isn’t what fuels you, but it was a big motivating factor for me—knowing that the awful people who denied so much of my truth couldn’t stop me now. That was empowering.

Yeah, I can be petty. I wrote to spite them, but also to spite the person they imagined me to be. The person I knew I wasn’t.

10. Dig Up Your Past

As a practical matter, memoir writing can be hard because our memories are faulty. I found I could settle the timeline of events if I dug through old blog posts. 

You might also find helpful details by talking to friends and family, reading a journal you kept, or poring over pictures. 

Social media timelines and archived chats are also useful if you have them available.

So that’s it. How to write a memoir in 10 steps. Easy, right?

if you’re looking for memoir publishing services, try a company like Modern Memoirs.

An Epilogue for Closure

An Epilogue for Closure

To celebrate last night’s insomnia, I updated the cover image for WHO YOU GONNA BELIEVE and posted an epilogue for closure.

It’s funny, because I remember when Hank Green was promoting his first book, he said in a video something like, “You can just end a book wherever you want.”

It seemed kind of obvious to me at the time. Like, of course you can end a book however and whenever you want. But then I also stressed over wrapping up this memoir for months. So it’s also an epiphany. I get it now.

I couldn’t just say “the end” and wave my proverbial wand at everything. I had to come to terms with being done, I suppose.

Because, I don’t know, I have a brain tumor? Because finishing might mean I can go ahead and die now?

I almost included that Hank Green anecdote in the epilogue, but since I name dropped the other Vlogbrother in the preface, I opted to not be that kind of weird.

Shut up. Name dropping here is different. It isn’t weird.

While I was checking WYGB links, formatting chapters, and double-checking the Table of Contents page last night, I also realized I stopped writing in an okay—maybe even artsy—place anyway.

So read it. It’s free. It’s sorta funny. It’s my revenge or something.

In other news, congratulations to me for getting 500 pageviews yesterday! And after just hoping for that very thing on Monday!

I’m not going to repeat that success today, unfortunately, but it was fun to watch my counter go up after someone big apparently shared my How to Make Cannabutter article on Facebook.

Facebook is good for being seen, but it’s not great for sustained traffic. Once your link slides down the news feed, you’re basically just a hunk of Velveeta in someone’s lactose-intolerant colon.

At the risk of being (more) annoying, I gotta plug this GoFundMe crap again too. I got bills. They’re multiplyin’.

Unfortunate Lessons

Unfortunate Lessons

One of the unfortunate lessons I have learned in life, I learned in unfortunate ways. Unfortunately. 

It is: not everyone will tell the truth about you.

It has broadly helpful applications, but it’s not always something I recognize right away. I’m getting better at seeing it earlier, though. Age and wisdom and whatnot.

It is akin to the oft-repeated “You are not responsible for the version of you other people have created in their minds.” 

The first time I grappled with the concept, I saw the liar’s lie for what it was. But it distressed me because I didn’t know the fix was so much easier than changing the liar’s mind. The solution was changing mine.

My ex-husband called me a “deadbeat wife” once. A former co-worker who fancied herself my boss (she should have taken the organizational flowchart out of my desk drawer before I was hired) told another co-worker “Emily didn’t do anything anyway” when I quit.

I realize now these arrows pierced me because I was, at that time and for the most part, a Type A personality.

The heck you mean I don’t do my part when I’m also doing 85% of yours?

What it took me much longer to realize is that they weren’t lying about me so much as lying to themselves. I was free to remove myself from the situation completely.

And so I did.

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The End

The End

It’s my birthday! I woke up earlier than usual this morning from a dream. That dream included a figure from my past, and my early morning mind went down a rabbit hole of thoughts including this one:

I’m not going to finish my memoir, because I don’t want to.

When I started Who You Gonna Believe a few years ago, I did a little research on memoir writing. One thing that came up frequently was authors saying how emotionally raw writing their stories left them.

Pfft! “This isn’t that hard,” I said to myself, digging in for another chapter.

Reader, in hindsight writing that shit was brutal. I’d dive into a story, trying to think about a scene and how to write it only to discover a year or two later that I was ruminating on terrible things not in the chapter. Things I didn’t include in the manuscript, but things that were essential to remember if I wanted to convey anything meaningful.

Then I’d have to think about the terrible things in the context of how to anonymize the written details. Then I’d have to read what I wrote for editing.

However well I thought I’d done, it was not a labor of love.

But I felt obligated to keep going for reasons, and I genuinely thought one day I’d write “The End” and walk away mostly unscathed.

In doing meditation and introspection regarding my anxiety, though, I recognized two things: 1.) writing a memoir requires living in the past, at least sometimes, and 2.) healing trauma requires being present.

Others might be good at moving back and forth between moments in time, but I am not. And so as a birthday gift to myself, I’m just walking away from this thing. Not a quitter, but—as always—a fighter.

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Fucks Are Finite and I’ve None Left

Fucks Are Finite and I’ve None Left

For Patron fans of Who You Gonna Believe, I have some good news: I’m really, really close to dropping the next chapter.

For non-Patron fans and the morbidly curious, I have some bad news: that new chapter is not going to be available to you right away.

There are a lot of reasons for keeping the upcoming chapter Patron-only for now. Mostly, though, it’s because Patrons have always been given early, ad-free access to new content as a thank you for financially supporting me while working on myself and Who You Gonna Believe.

Chapters 1–25 of WYGB, I have decided, are so old now that they will remain free to read. (Also putting them back behind the paywall is tedious, and I don’t feel like doing it.)

Some might call this next installment my Me Too* story. The abuser’s identity, like Rodney’s, is masked by the obfuscation and omission of details. For my sake, not his.

Chapter 26, debuting in September, comes with a content warning for sexual and psychological abuse of a minor. It’s not graphic, but I understand the benefit of avoiding this kind of stuff until you’re ready.

There’s an introspection in memoir writing—mine anyway—that leads to new understanding, and as a writer I’ve had to decide how to handle that. I think the option-weighing is what stymied me for a bit.

Anyhoo…

Fucks are finite, and I’ve none left.

* This movement was founded by Tarana Burke. Please support Girls for Gender Equity.

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